heteroh:

"your lips look so chapped"

image

(via noo-interruption)

naliest:

Am I doing this right

naliest:

Am I doing this right

(via noo-interruption)

northnew:

undefinedarchetype:

best six second exchange i have ever seen in my life

(via noo-interruption)

Cinderella never asked for a prince. She asked for a night off and a dress.

Like not once did she say “I want a prince to come and rescue me from my situation.”

She just wanted to look cute and turn the fuck up at the party.

(via barbie-dolls-xx)

(via orchidsofmay)

breakfastburritoe:

ordon-village:

stunningpicture:

Lobster in a bucket looks like a gigantic monster on a metallic planet, and the waterdrops look like stars.

This is transcendental. 

THIS FUCKED ME UP FOR 3 DAYS

breakfastburritoe:

ordon-village:

stunningpicture:

Lobster in a bucket looks like a gigantic monster on a metallic planet, and the waterdrops look like stars.

This is transcendental. 

THIS FUCKED ME UP FOR 3 DAYS

(via yousyouk)

handsssalloverr:

hawkgrl:

the whole idea of daddy issues makes me so uncomfortable? like your father abandoned you, you had a bad relationship with him or he abused you and we created a term to shame, humiliate and laugh at you for dealing with the emotions that come with that

this needs more notes

(via xxmadcarol98xx)

honorings:

If you’re hot and you think I’m hot you need to speak the fuck up

(via fiftyshadesofwtf)

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

(via tigersinlondon)

eluciidate:

this is how I would doctor

(via joshpeck)

headphones-in-do-not-disturb:

theorgyorganizer:

fuck education who wants to start a band

your URL makes me suspicious of your intentions with this band.

(via 011010010110111101110101)

catsfurever:

justsaynope:

catsfurever:

“get in the kitchen” jokes

image

barbie should get back in the kitchen and cook up some sicker burns

image

(via 011010010110111101110101)

ratchet-trolls:

t-angy:

t-angy:

what do random people drink from

a stRAWR xD

im in pain 

(via bletchelypark)

poetic:

is it just me or do you think it’d be helpful if they showed a model in the size you were looking for when you’re trying to shop online, like yes that looks great in size small but what about the other sizes 

(via fiftyshadesofwtf)

There’s no point to a guy yelling, “Hey sexy baby” at me out of the passenger window of a car as it speeds past. Even if I was into creepy misogynists and wanted to give him my number, I couldn’t. The car didn’t even slow down. But that’s okay, because he wasn’t actually hitting on me. The point wasn’t to proposition me or chat me up. The only point was to remind me, and all women, that our bodies are his to stare at, assess, comment on, even touch. “Hey sexy baby” is the first part of a sentence that finishes, “this is your daily message from the patriarchy, reminding you that your body is public property”. My First Name Ain’t Baby: ‘Hey Baby’ and Street Harassment (via official-mens-frights-activist)

(via clara-who)